Showing items 1 - 10 of 118

2-10-0 Decapod N XL L M4

The 2-10-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, ten powered and coupled driving wheels on five axles, and no trailing wheels. This arrangement was often named Decapod, especially in the United States.

These locomotives were popular in Europe, particularly in Germany and Russia; British use of the type was confined to the period during and after World War II. In the United States, the 2-10-0 was not widely popular but was a favorite of a small number of railroads more…

2-6-2T Prairie N XL L M4

The 2-6-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels, six coupled driving wheels and two trailing wheels. This arrangement is commonly called a Prairie. The majority of American 2-6-2s were tender locomotives, but in Europe tank locomotives, described as 2-6-2T, were more common. The first 2-6-2 tender locomotives for a North American customer were built by Brooks Locomotive Works in 1900 for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, for use on the Midwestern prairies. The type more…

2-8-2 Heavy Mikado N XL L M4

The 2-8-2 wheel configuration on steam locomotives was one of the most highly used configurations made. This type of locomotive with 2 pilot wheels, 8 drive wheels, and 2 trailing wheels to support a larger firebox was first built for the Emperor of Japan, thus the name Mikado type. The first Mikado built for service in the US was built in 1901 and was owed by the Bismarck, Washburn and Great Falls until 1904 when it was acquired by the Soo Line.

The USRA Heavy Mikado was a USRA standard class more…

4-12-2 Three Cylinder N XL L M4

The 4-12-2 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels, twelve coupled driving wheels, and two trailing wheels. This arrangement was named the Union Pacific type, after the only railroad to use it, the Union Pacific Railroad.

Only one type of locomotive with a 4-12-2 wheel arrangement was built: the Union Pacific Railroad's 9000-series locomotives, 88 of which were built by ALCO between 1926 and 1930. These locomotives were used to increase the speed of freight trains in flat more…

4-6-0 Ten-Wheeler N XL L M4

The 4-6-0 represents the configuration of four leading wheels on two axles in a leading bogie and six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles with the absence of trailing wheels. In the mid 19th century, this wheel arrangement became the second most popular configuration for new steam locomotives in the United States of America, where this type is commonly referred to as a Ten-wheeler. As a locomotive pulling trains of lightweight all wood passenger cars in the 1890-1920s, it was more…

AEM-7/ALP-44 N XL L M4

AEM-7/ALP-44

The AEM-7 is a twin-cab four-axle 7,000 hp (5.2 MW) B-B electric locomotive built by Electro-Motive Division (EMD) and ASEA between 1978–1988. The locomotive was a derivative of the Swedish SJ Rc4 designed for passenger service in the United States. The primary customer was Amtrak, which bought 54 for use on the Northeast Corridor and Keystone Corridor. Two commuter operators, MARC and SEPTA, also purchased locomotives.

As this is a double ended Electric Locomotive with MANY more…

ALCO 12-244 N XL L M4

The American Locomotive Company's model 244 prime mover was developed during the mid-1940s to power its post-war diesel locomotives. Interestingly, while Alco helped pioneer diesel technology dating back to the 1920s it had difficulty truly competing against Electro-Motive-Division due to reliability issues with its diesel engines. Before Alco began implementing the 244 in its locomotives the builder had spent most of the 1930s developing an earlier model that was used in most of its early more…

ALCO 12-244 Ed2 N XL L M4

The American Locomotive Company's model 244 prime mover was developed during the mid-1940s to power its post-war diesel locomotives. Interestingly, while Alco helped pioneer diesel technology dating back to the 1920s it had difficulty truly competing against Electro-Motive-Division due to reliability issues with its diesel engines. Before Alco began implementing the 244 in its locomotives the builder had spent most of the 1930s developing an earlier model that was used in most of its early more…

ALCO 12-251B N XL L M4

The ALCO 251 prime mover was the most popular and abundant prime mover ever made by the company. While it proved to be quite successful, it sadly outlived its original manufacturer, ALCO who closed their doors in 1969. The 251 prime mover is actually still available to purchase today from Fairbanks Morse for use in Marine, Generator, and locomotive uses.

The 1800 horsepower 12cyl version of the 251B could be found in the following locomotives:

RS-11, RSD-12, RS-18, RS-36, FPA-4, FPB-4, more…

ALCO 12-251B Ed2 N XL L M4

The ALCO 251 prime mover was the most popular and abundant prime mover ever made by the company. While it proved to be quite successful, it sadly outlived its original manufacturer, ALCO who closed their doors in 1969. The 251 prime mover is actually still available to purchase today from Fairbanks Morse for use in Marine, Generator, and locomotive uses.

The 1800 horsepower 12cyl version of the 251B could be found in the following locomotives:

RS-11, RSD-12, RS-18, RS-36, FPA-4, FPB-4, more…